Ronald C. Kobernick, DDS, MScD, PA
Periodontics
10601 Seminole Blvd, Largo, FL & 111 2nd Avenue NE, St. Petersburg, FL
727-397-8503

Classification of Face and Teeth

Orthodontic Classifications Module

To provide you with a better understanding of bite classifications, we have provided the following multimedia presentation. Many common questions pertaining to bite classification are discussed.

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Classification of Teeth

The classification of the relationship between the upper teeth and lower teeth (and the jaws) is divided into three main categories: Class I, II, and III.

Class I

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Class I is a normal relationship between the position of upper teeth, lower teeth and the jaws. Tooth and jaw positions are in harmony.

Class II

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In a Class II malocclusion, the lower first molar is posterior (or more towards the back of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the upper front teeth and jaw project further forward than the lower teeth and jaw. There maybe a convex appearance in the profile when significant tooth/jaw discrepancies are present, with a receding chin and lower lip. Class II problems can be due to insufficient growth of the lower jaw, too much growth of the upper jaw, or a combination of the two.

Class III

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In a Class III malocclusion, the lower first molar is anterior (or more towards the front of the mouth) than the upper first molar. In this abnormal relationship, the lower teeth and jaw project further forward than the upper teeth and jaws. There is a concave appearance in profile with a prominent chin. Class III problems are usually due to an overgrowth in the lower jaw, undergrowth of the upper jaw, or a combination of the two.

Classification of Faces

It is not sufficient to categorize orthodontic malocclusions on the basis of a classification of the teeth alone. The relationship with other craniofacial structures must also be taken into consideration.

Class 1: Maxillary-Mandibular Dental Protrusion — teeth:

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This is an example of a dental malocclusion that may require the removal of teeth for correction.

Maxillary-Mandibular Dental Retrusion — teeth: This is an example of a dental malocclusion that may be treated with expansion rather than removing teeth.

Class 2: Maxillary Dental Protrusion — teeth:

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This malocclusion may require the removal of teeth.

**** How to alter this in the graphic because of the discussion of early treatment: Mandibular Retrognathism — jaws: The lower jawbone has not grown as much as the upper jaw. Depending on its severity, this example of a Class II malocclusion demonstrates the potential need for jaw surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. ***Is this not redundant, with the below “mandibular retrognathism”

Maxillary Dental Protrusion — teeth
Mandibular Retrognathism — jaws
These Class II malocclusions are more difficult to treat due to the skeletal disharmony and may require orthognathic surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment.

Class 3: Mandibular Dental Protrusion — teeth:

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The lower teeth are too far in front of the upper teeth. This malocclusion is treated with orthodontic procedures which may require the extraction of teeth due to the dental protrusion.

Mandibular Prognathism — jaws: The lower jaw bone has outgrown the upper jaw. This malocclusion is more difficult to treat due to the skeletal disharmony and may require orthognathic (jaw) surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment.

10601 Seminole Blvd., Largo, FL 33778 P: 727-397-8503 F: 727-398-2679

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